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VP Chapter Liaison

Meghan Doherty
Chapter
Austin
Biography
Megan was born in Austin and grew up along the Barton Creek Greenbelt. The dichotomy of nature and city life inspired Meghan to earn a B.A. in Geography and the Environment from the University of Texas at Austin. After a bout of chronic illness as a teen, Meghan’s interest turned to healing foods and herbs. She studied herbology at Yo San University in Los Angeles where she also received a certificate in Wellness Coaching. Meghan’s eclectic professional background began with over 10 years of entrepreneurship as caterer to movie sets, event vendor of superfood shakes at large festivals, and eventually creator and owner of an herbal-drinks café in San Miguel de Allende that, after 4 years, she sold. Meghan returned to Austin after 13 years away to manage the 2020 census field operations for all of Travis County. She oversaw a staff of 1500 workers during a global pandemic. Next, Meghan contracted as Park Operation Manager for Pease Park Conservancy where she created the scope of the program as Austin’s first private manager for a public park. Currently Meghan works for the City of Austin coordinating Circular Economy business engagement. She draws Austin businesses to circular practices, and connects businesses with innovative processes to upcycle and minimize waste. Ecology and conservation are deep passions for Meghan as a current Texas Master Naturalist. However, her first love is for people, and native plants excite Meghan most because of their intersection with the humans who enjoy them. For this reason, Meghan is delighted and equipped to be a diligent and amicable VP Chapter Liaison for the Native Plant Society of Texas.
Meghan Doherty

VP Chapter Liaison

Chapter
Austin
Biography
Megan was born in Austin and grew up along the Barton Creek Greenbelt. The dichotomy of nature and city life inspired Meghan to earn a B.A. in Geography and the Environment from the University of Texas at Austin. After a bout of chronic illness as a teen, Meghan’s interest turned to healing foods and herbs. She studied herbology at Yo San University in Los Angeles where she also received a certificate in Wellness Coaching. Meghan’s eclectic professional background began with over 10 years of entrepreneurship as caterer to movie sets, event vendor of superfood shakes at large festivals, and eventually creator and owner of an herbal-drinks café in San Miguel de Allende that, after 4 years, she sold. Meghan returned to Austin after 13 years away to manage the 2020 census field operations for all of Travis County. She oversaw a staff of 1500 workers during a global pandemic. Next, Meghan contracted as Park Operation Manager for Pease Park Conservancy where she created the scope of the program as Austin’s first private manager for a public park. Currently Meghan works for the City of Austin coordinating Circular Economy business engagement. She draws Austin businesses to circular practices, and connects businesses with innovative processes to upcycle and minimize waste. Ecology and conservation are deep passions for Meghan as a current Texas Master Naturalist. However, her first love is for people, and native plants excite Meghan most because of their intersection with the humans who enjoy them. For this reason, Meghan is delighted and equipped to be a diligent and amicable VP Chapter Liaison for the Native Plant Society of Texas.
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About the Region

New Braunfels, the location of our Fall 2024 Symposium, straddles both the Edwards Plateau Ecoregion and the Blackland Prairie ecoregion. Interstate 35 divides the city of New Braunfels; its path through the city closely parallels the boundary of these two ecoregions, with the Edwards Plateau on the west side and the Blackland Prairies region to the east. The Edwards Plateau area is also called the Hill Country; however, this general term covers a much larger area extending farther north. Spring-fed creeks are found throughout the region; deep limestone canyons, rivers, and lakes (reservoirs) are common. Ashe juniper is perhaps the most common woody species found throughout the region. Additional woody species include various species of oak, with live oak (Quercus fusiformis) being the most common. Sycamores (Platanus occidentalis) and bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) border waterways. This area is well known for its spring wildflower displays, though they may be viewed in spring, late summer, and fall, as well. According to Texas Parks and Wildlife, average annual rainfall in the Edwards Plateau ranges from 15 to 34 inches.

The Blackland Prairie extends from the Red River south to San Antonio, bordered on the west by the Edwards Plateau and the Cross Timbers, and on the east by the Post Oak Savannah. Annual rainfall averages 30 to 40 inches, with higher averages to the east. This region is dominated by prairie species. The most common grass species include little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) and Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) in the uplands and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) in the riparian areas and drainages. Common herbaceous flowering plants include salvias, penstemons, and silphiums. This area has suffered greatly from overgrazing and agricultural use. Few intact areas remain, though many of the plants can be found along county roadsides throughout the region.

Our four host chapters (New Braunfels, Lindheimer, Guadalupe, and the Hill Country chapters) are located in one or both of the ecoregions above. However, the eastern portion of Guadalupe County also falls within the Post Oak Savanna ecoregion. Annual rainfall averages 35 to 45 inches, with higher averages to the east. A wide variety of hardwood trees are found, including several species of oaks, elms, and in the Bastrop area, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). Grasses and forbs dominate in the open savannas, with most common grass being little bluestem. Ranching, agriculture, and fire suppression have allowed woody species to encroach on the once-open savannas.

Source: Wildflowers of Texas by Michael Eason