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Texas Native Plants Magazine

Latest Issues

Spring 2024 Member Magazine

A Spring to Remember | Welcoming Spring with Open Arms | 2023 Ann Miller Gonzalez Research Grant Recipients | Wet and Wild: Diving into the Underworld of Aquatic Plants | Hidden Gems: Unique Landscaping Options | Your Favorite Flora Revealed | Inviting the Prairie Into Your Home Landscape | Remembering “Mr. Bluebonnet” | Spreading the Monarch Mission | Gardening with a Purpose | Save Time Landscape Planning This Spring

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Cultivating conservation, planting seeds of change. Winter 2024 member magazine cover page

Winter 2024 Member Magazine

From Pines to Petals: Exploring the Pineywoods | 2023 Society Award Recipients | No-Freeze Trees | Water-Wise Strategies | Conservation Champions | Power Plants for Pollinators | Using the Invasive Plant Database | Coming Soon: More Native Milkweed! | Native Gardens are For the Birds | Native Plants Thriving in Town Hall | Promoting Native Milkweeds | Engaging the Next Generation | Native Plant Student Art Showcased | If You Know What to Look For

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Fall 2023 Member Magazine

Texas really IS like a whole ‘nother country. Its sheer size, variety of terrain, and biological diversity is staggering. The great Lone Star state contains barrier islands and coastal lowlands, large river floodplain forests, rolling plains and plateaus, forested hills, deserts, and a wide variety of aquatic habitats.

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Distribution

  • Texas Native Plants is published quarterly and the digital version is distributed free to all Society members in current standing.
  • The digital version is also available in our library below.
  • Print versions are mailed at no cost to Society members in current standing who select to receive a print copy when they join/renew.
  • Libraries, educational institutions and other organizations may qualify to receive the publication for a $5 annual fee.
  • Contact the membership coordinator.
  • Many of our chapters publish their own newsletters and websites.
  • These have their own deadlines and guidelines. See list of chapters.

History

Since its founding the Society has provided a news periodical to its members. there have been a variety of names and formats. The Texas Wildfower Newsletter edited by Carroll Abbott served as the first newsletter. He advocated the formation of the Native Plant Society of Texas in his quarterly publication Texas Wildflower Newsletter. After the Society was created in 1980, a free subscription to Abbott’s newsletter was provided as a benefit to all members. His declining health eventually prompted Abbott to request that the Society start its own newsletter. Lean more about the Carroll Abbott story.

Beginning in 1983 our own official publication has documented the evolution of the native plant movement and the Native Plant Society of Texas. The publication has had several slightly different names and formats over the years. By 2005 it had evolved into a full-color glossy magazine.

Editorial Submissions

The Native Plant Society of Texas encourages submission of articles, photos, pertinent news or other interesting information for publication.

  • Submit articles or written items as email attachments.
  • Send photos as email attachments in JPG, RAW or TIFF format.
  • Larger file size and best quality are preferable.
  • Contact the Editor for more information.

We reserve the right to edit all submissions for accuracy, relevance, length, grammar or for other reason. In matters of style our print publication generally follows the Chicago Manual of Style.

Unless prior arrangements with the editor are made, submissions may also appear on our website and linked on our social media pages. We do not accept outside advertising in any of our publications.

Publications Library

Click below to view issues by year/editor. Or visit our online archive.

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2024 – Spring

Volume 42 , No. 2
Editor: Lindsey Townsend
Designer: Urvi Joshi
  • A Spring to Remember
  • Welcoming Spring with Open Arms
  • 2023 Ann Miller Gonzalez Research Grant Recipients
  • Wet and Wild: Diving into the Underworld of Aquatic Plants
  • Hidden Gems: Unique Landscaping Options
  • Your Favorite Flora Revealed
  • Inviting the Prairie Into Your Home Landscape
  • Remembering “Mr. Bluebonnet”
  • Spreading the Monarch Mission
  • Gardening with a Purpose
  • Save Time Landscape Planning This Spring

2024 – Winter

Volume 42 , No. 1
Editor: Lindsey Townsend
Designer: Urvi Joshi
  • Water -Wise Strategies
  • Identifying Invasive Plants
  • Growing Native Milkweeds

2023 – Fall

Volume 41, No. 4
Editor: Lindsey Townsend
Designer: Urvi Joshi
  • Texas Ecoregions Thrive with Native Plants
  • The Art of Native Plant Landscaping: From Mistakes to Mastery
  • Choose Native over Tropical Milkweed
  • Restoring My Prairie Home
  • Choosing Nature’s Best
  • Honoring a Historic Site with Native Plants
  • Member Success Story: Be the Change
  • Garden Signs Are Well Received
  • Native Plants Shine at HOA Event
  • Container Gardening with Native Plants
  • My Journey with Native Plants

2023 – Summer

Volume 41, No. 3
Editor: Bill Hopkins and Ricky Linex
Designer: Stephanie Long
  • Arboretum San Antonio
  • Life Behind the Pine Curtain
  • Featured San Antonio Member
  • 2023 Scholarship Recipients
  • Eradicate Bastard Cabbage
  • Annual Contests
  • Landscaping’s Many Myths
  • Open Exec. Officer Positions
  • Tyler Chapter Restarting
  • Fall Symposium Overview
  • Links You May Have Missed

2023 – Spring

Volume 41, No. 2
Editor: Susan Austin
Designer: Stephanie Long
  • In Praise of Demonstration Gardens
  • Frogfruit (Phyla nodiflora): A Humble Hero
  • Sharing Nature with Children
  • The Lawn Dilemma
  • Never Forget Garden
  • Peanut clover (Trifolium polymorphum)

2023 – Winter

Volume 41, No. 1
Editor: Susan Austin
Designer: Stephanie Long
  • Annual Award Winners
  • San Antonio Sacred Grounds
  • Christmas Cholla

2022 – Fall

Volume 40, No. 4
Editor: Susan Austin
Designer: Stephanie Long
  • Fort Worth Pocket Prairie
  • Buying Native Plants
  • Texas Native Plant Week

2022 – Summer

Volume 40, No. 3
Editor: Susan Austin
Designer: Stephanie Long
  • Fall Symposium Details
  • Slippery Elm, Creek Plum & Texas Persimmon
  • Plants Misbehaving: Invasive Plants

2022 – Spring

Volume 40, No. 2
Editor: Susan Austin
Designer: Stephanie Long
  • Explore Westcave
  • Scholarship & Grant Awards
  • Engaging Youth in Your Chapter

2022 – Winter

Volume 40, No. 1
Editor: Susan Austin
  • Invasives
  • New Membership Portal
  • New NLCP Coordinator Linda Foss

2021 – Fall

Volume 39, No. 4
Editor: Susan Austin
  • Meet Ricky!
  • Plants for pollinators
  • Virtual meetings

2021 – Summer

Volume 39, No. 3
Editor: Susan Austin
  • Member Pins
  • Identifying Milkweed Species
  • Native Mulberries

2021 – Spring

Volume 39, No. 2
Editor: Susan Austin
  • Trout Lily Walk
  • Velcro Plant
  • After the Winter Freeze – What Now?

2021 – Winter

Volume 39, No. 1
Editor: Susan Austin
  • Huisache
  • Remembering Sally Wasowski
  • Chiltepin – Capsicum annuum

2020 – Fall

Volume 38, No. 4
Editor: Susan Austin
  • Pigeonberry
  • Moth Week
  • Tiny Plants

2020 – Summer

Volume 38, No. 3
Editor: Susan Austin
  • Broadcast Hill
  • Curly Mesquite
  • Frogfruit
  • Roughleaf Dogwood

2020 – Spring

Volume 38, No. 2
Editor: Susan Austin
  • Native Fruit
  • Wild Bergamot
  • Monarch Festival

2020 – Winter

Volume 38, No. 1
Editor: Susan Austin
  • New Pollinator Pathway
  • Photo Contest Winners
  • Texas Orchid

2019 – Fall

Volume 37, No. 4
Editor: Susan Austin
  • Hummingbirds
  • Native Fruits
  • Annual Symposium

2019 – Summer

Volume 37, No. 3
Editor: Susan Austin
  • Contests for photos, videos and newsletters
  • Willowleaf Sunflower
  • Milkweed Moth
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About the Region

New Braunfels, the location of our Fall 2024 Symposium, straddles both the Edwards Plateau Ecoregion and the Blackland Prairie ecoregion. Interstate 35 divides the city of New Braunfels; its path through the city closely parallels the boundary of these two ecoregions, with the Edwards Plateau on the west side and the Blackland Prairies region to the east. The Edwards Plateau area is also called the Hill Country; however, this general term covers a much larger area extending farther north. Spring-fed creeks are found throughout the region; deep limestone canyons, rivers, and lakes (reservoirs) are common. Ashe juniper is perhaps the most common woody species found throughout the region. Additional woody species include various species of oak, with live oak (Quercus fusiformis) being the most common. Sycamores (Platanus occidentalis) and bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) border waterways. This area is well known for its spring wildflower displays, though they may be viewed in spring, late summer, and fall, as well. According to Texas Parks and Wildlife, average annual rainfall in the Edwards Plateau ranges from 15 to 34 inches.

The Blackland Prairie extends from the Red River south to San Antonio, bordered on the west by the Edwards Plateau and the Cross Timbers, and on the east by the Post Oak Savannah. Annual rainfall averages 30 to 40 inches, with higher averages to the east. This region is dominated by prairie species. The most common grass species include little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) and Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) in the uplands and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) in the riparian areas and drainages. Common herbaceous flowering plants include salvias, penstemons, and silphiums. This area has suffered greatly from overgrazing and agricultural use. Few intact areas remain, though many of the plants can be found along county roadsides throughout the region.

Our four host chapters (New Braunfels, Lindheimer, Guadalupe, and the Hill Country chapters) are located in one or both of the ecoregions above. However, the eastern portion of Guadalupe County also falls within the Post Oak Savanna ecoregion. Annual rainfall averages 35 to 45 inches, with higher averages to the east. A wide variety of hardwood trees are found, including several species of oaks, elms, and in the Bastrop area, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). Grasses and forbs dominate in the open savannas, with most common grass being little bluestem. Ranching, agriculture, and fire suppression have allowed woody species to encroach on the once-open savannas.

Source: Wildflowers of Texas by Michael Eason