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Texas Redbud

Cercis canadensis var. texensis

Other common name(s):

Family:

Fabaceae (Pea Family)

Plant Ecoregion Distribution Map

Cross Timbers, Edwards Plateau, Southern Texas Plains, Texas Blackland Prairies
Eastern Cross Timbers, Grand Prairie, Limestone Cut Plain, Western Cross Timbers
Balcones Canyonlands, Edwards Plateau Woodland, Llano Uplift, Semiarid Edwards Plateau
Northern Nueces Alluvial Plains, Semiarid Edwards Bajada
Floodplains and Low Terraces1, Northern Blackland Prairie

Plant Characteristics

Growth Form

Tree

Height

15
to
20
ft.

Spread

10
to
15
ft.

Leaf Retention

Deciduous

Lifespan

Perennial

Habitat and Care Requirements

Soil Type(s)

Limestone, Well Drained

Light Requirement

Sun

Water Requirement

Very Low, Medium

Native Habitat

Woodland

Bloom and Attraction

Bloom Color

Pink, Purple

Bloom Season

Spring

Seasonal Interest

Seeds, Nectar, Larval Host

Wildlife Benefit

Butterflies, Birds, Hummingbirds, Bees

Maintenance

Provide well drained soil. Prune to fit garden space or to raise canopy over walkways if needed. Refrain from pruning late in winter as blooms form on old wood in spring. Remove suckers from the ground if desired. Fall and winter: Borers can be found in this tree; use natural controls – compost over the root system, or predatory wasps. Organic controls include sticky tape around base of tree or treating soil and bore holes with beneficial nematodes. Propagation: Seed.

Comments

Blooms March-April. Mostly multi-trunked with thick leathery leaves, less wavy than the Mexican variety. Mexican Redbud, with smaller, wavy edged leaves, is the drought tolerant alternative. Eastern Redbud is not recommended for Central Texas. Replaces Invasives: Chinese Tallow Tree, Golden Rain Tree, Salt Cedar. Larval Host: Henry’s Elfin Butterfly.
Previous Scientific Name(s): Synonym(s): Cercis canadensis ssp. texensis, Cercis occidentalis

References

1) Griffith, Bryce, Omernick & Rodgers (2007). Ecoregions of Texas. 2) https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CECAT. 3) http://bonap.net/TDC/Image/Map?taxonType=Species&taxonId=27176&locationType=County&mapType=Normal. 4) Miller, George O., Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas 2nd Ed., 2013, pg 48. 5) Wasowski and Wasowski, Native Texas Plants Landscaping Region by Region, 1991, pg. 282. 6) https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=527243#null, 7) Native and Adapted Landscape Plants, City of Austin and Texas A&M, 2014.