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Illinois Bundleflower

Desmanthus illinoensis

Other common name(s):

Bundleflower, Prairie Bundle Flower, Prickleweed, Illinois Desmanthus, Prairie Mimosa

Family:

Fabaceae (Pea Family)

Plant Ecoregion Distribution Map

Central Great Plains, Chihuahuan Deserts, Cross Timbers, East Central Texas Plains, Edwards Plateau, Gulf Coast Prairies and Marshes, High Plains, Southwestern Tablelands, Texas Blackland Prairies, Western Gulf Coastal Plain
Broken Red Plains, Limestone Plains, Red Prairie
Low Mountains and Bajadas
Carbonate Cross Timbers, Eastern Cross Timbers, Grand Prairie, Limestone Cut Plain, Western Cross Timbers
Bastrop Lost Pines, Floodplains and Low Terraces2, Northern Post Oak Savanna, Northern Prairie Outliers, San Antonio Prairie, Southern Post Oak Savanna
Balcones Canyonlands, Edwards Plateau Woodland, Llano Uplift, Semiarid Edwards Plateau
Northern Humid Gulf Coastal Prairies
Arid Llano Estacado, Canadian/Cimarron High Plains
Canadian/Cimarron Breaks, Caprock Canyons Badlands Breaks, Flat Tablelands and Valleys, Semiarid Canadian Breaks
Floodplains and Low Terraces1, Northern Blackland Prairie, Southern Blackland Prairie
Flatwoods, Southern Tertiary Uplands

Plant Characteristics

Growth Form

Shrub

Height

1
to
3
ft.

Spread

1
to
3
ft.

Leaf Retention

Deciduous

Lifespan

Perennial

Habitat and Care Requirements

Soil Type(s)

Sand, Loam, Clay

Light Requirement

Sun

Water Requirement

Medium

Native Habitat

Woodland, Wetland or Riparian

Bloom and Attraction

Bloom Color

White

Bloom Season

Spring, Summer

Seasonal Interest

Seeds, Nectar, Pollen

Wildlife Benefit

Butterflies, Birds

Maintenance

Legumes enrich soil through nitrogen fixation. Considered one of the most important prairie legumes. Easily grown. Tends to bloom after rains. Deep-rooted, drought tolerant. Propagation: Seed.

Comments

Blooms May-September. An erect multi-branched. plant Fern-like leaves are twice pinnately compound; they fold in strong sunlight and when touched. Ball-shaped clusters of small whitish or greenish flowers are followed by flat, leathery, twisted seedpods. Attracts butterflies. Seeds are important to upland game birds (quail, prairie chicken) and other wildlife. Leaves eaten by browsers.
Previous Scientific Name(s): Synonym(s): Acuan illinoense, Mimosa illinoensis

References

1) Griffith, Bryce, Omernick & Rodgers (2007). Ecoregions of Texas. 2) https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=DEIL. 3) https://portal.torcherbaria.org/portal/taxa/index.php?taxon=Desmanthus+illinoensis&formsubmit=Search+Terms. 4) http://bonap.net/TDC/Image/Map?taxonType=Species&taxonId=10969&locationType=County&mapType=Normal. 5) https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=26661#null., 6) https://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?taxonid=280349, 7) https://www.morningskygreenery.com/product/desmanthus-illinoensis/