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Snakeherb

Dyschoriste linearis

Other common name(s):

Polkadots, Narrowleaf Dyschoriste

Family:

Acanthaceae (Acanthus Family)

Plant Ecoregion Distribution Map

Central Great Plains, Chihuahuan Deserts, Cross Timbers, East Central Texas Plains, Edwards Plateau, Gulf Coast Prairies and Marshes, Southern Texas Plains, Southwestern Tablelands, Texas Blackland Prairies
Broken Red Plains, Limestone Plains, Red Prairie
Chihuahuan Basins and Playas, Chihuahuan Desert Grasslands, Chihuahuan Montane Woodlands, Low Mountains and Bajadas, Stockton Plateau
Carbonate Cross Timbers, Eastern Cross Timbers, Grand Prairie, Limestone Cut Plain, Western Cross Timbers
Southern Post Oak Savanna
Balcones Canyonlands, Edwards Plateau Woodland, Llano Uplift
Floodplains and Low Terraces4, Mid-Coast Barrier Islands and Coastal Marshes, Northern Humid Gulf Coastal Prairies, Southern Subhumid Gulf Coastal Prairies
Northern Nueces Alluvial Plains, Rio Grande Floodplain and Terraces, Semiarid Edwards Bajada, Texas-Tamaulipan Thornscrub
Caprock Canyons Badlands Breaks, Flat Tablelands and Valleys
Floodplains and Low Terraces1, Northern Blackland Prairie, Southern Blackland Prairie

Plant Characteristics

Growth Form

Groundcover

Height

1
to
2
ft.

Spread

1
to
2
ft.

Leaf Retention

Deciduous

Lifespan

Perennial

Habitat and Care Requirements

Soil Type(s)

Sand, Clay, Rocky, Caliche, Well Drained

Light Requirement

Sun

Water Requirement

Low

Native Habitat

Grassland

Bloom and Attraction

Bloom Color

Purple

Bloom Season

Spring, Summer

Seasonal Interest

Nectar

Wildlife Benefit

Butterflies

Maintenance

With moderate supplemental water in the summer, the plant will stay green through drought conditions. Prefers caliche, but will also do well in other well drained soils.

Comments

Blooms April-October. Creates a lush groundcover. Snake Herb is a multi-branched perennial. The square stems are covered with stiff hairs. Lavender to purple flowers are 2-lipped with a purple stripe running down the throat. Blooms mainly in Spring but will also do so throughout the year after a rain. Attracts butterflies.

References

1) Griffith, Bryce, Omernick & Rodgers (2007). Ecoregions of Texas. 2) https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=DYLI. 3) http://bonap.net/TDC/Image/Map?taxonType=Species&taxonId=32&locationType=County&mapType=Normal. 4) https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=502193#null., 5) Native and Adapted Landscape Plants, City of Austin and Texas A&M, 2014.