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Native Plant Society of Texas

Agarita

Berberis trifoliolata

Other common name(s):

Agarito, Algerita, Laredo Mahonia, Laredo Oregon-grape, Trifoliate Barberry, Wild Currant

Family:

Berberidaceae (Barberry Family)

Plant Ecoregion Distribution Map

Central Great Plains, Chihuahuan Deserts, Cross Timbers, Edwards Plateau, Gulf Coast Prairies and Marshes, High Plains, Southern Texas Plains, Texas Blackland Prairies
Broken Red Plains, Limestone Plains, Red Prairie
Chihuahuan Basins and Playas, Chihuahuan Desert Grasslands, Chihuahuan Montane Woodlands, Low Mountains and Bajadas, Stockton Plateau
Carbonate Cross Timbers, Eastern Cross Timbers, Grand Prairie, Limestone Cut Plain, Western Cross Timbers
Balcones Canyonlands, Edwards Plateau Woodland, Llano Uplift, Semiarid Edwards Plateau
Coastal Sand Plain, Southern Subhumid Gulf Coastal Prairies
Llano Estacado, Rolling Sand Plains
Northern Nueces Alluvial Plains, Rio Grande Floodplain and Terraces, Semiarid Edwards Bajada, Texas-Tamaulipan Thornscrub
Floodplains and Low Terraces1, Northern Blackland Prairie

Plant Characteristics

Growth Form

Shrub

Height

3
to
6
ft.

Spread

3
to
6
ft.

Leaf Retention

Evergreen

Lifespan

Perennial

Habitat and Care Requirements

Soil Type(s)

Loam, Clay, Limestone, Caliche, Well Drained

Light Requirement

Sun

Water Requirement

Very Low

Native Habitat

Woodland

Bloom and Attraction

Bloom Color

Yellow

Bloom Season

Spring

Seasonal Interest

Berry, Nectar, Nesting Material

Wildlife Benefit

Butterflies, Birds, Small Mammals, Bees

Maintenance

Summer, Fall: Prune lightly to fit garden space. Heavier pruning will produce thicker growth. Prune no later than fall as February bloom and berries that follow will be affected. Selectively prune leaves away from sidewalks or patios due to prickly leaves.

Comments

Fast growing, evergreen shrub with bluish-green, holly-like foliage. The prickly leaves are not pedestrian friendly but provide excellent nesting for birds. Has fragrant early spring flowers. Birds love the berries. Replaces Invasives: Nandina, Heavenly Bamboo
Previous Scientific Name(s): Synonym/s: Mahonia trifoliolata var. glauca, Berberis trifoliolata var. glauca

References

1) Griffith, Bryce, Omernick & Rodgers (2007). Ecoregions of Texas. 2) https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=MATR3. 3) https://portal.torcherbaria.org/portal/taxa/index.php?taxon=Berberis+trifoliolata&formsubmit=Search+Terms. 4) http://bonap.net/TDC/Image/Map?taxonType=Species&taxonId=4900&locationType=County&mapType=Normal. 5) Miller, George O., Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas 2nd Ed., 2013, pg 48. 6) Wasowski and Wasowski, Native Texas Plants Landscaping Region by Region, 1991, pg. 233. 7) https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=503652#null, 8) Native and Adapted Landscape Plants, City of Austin and Texas A&M, 2014.