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Blackfoot Daisy

Melampodium leucanthum

Other common name(s):

Rock Daisy, Plains Blackfoot, Arnica

Family:

Asteraceae (Aster Family)

Plant Ecoregion Distribution Map

Central Great Plains, Chihuahuan Deserts, Cross Timbers, Edwards Plateau, High Plains, Southern Texas Plains, Southwestern Tablelands
Broken Red Plains, Limestone Plains, Red Prairie
Chihuahuan Basins and Playas, Chihuahuan Desert Grasslands, Chihuahuan Montane Woodlands, Low Mountains and Bajadas, Stockton Plateau
Carbonate Cross Timbers, Limestone Cut Plain, Western Cross Timbers
Balcones Canyonlands, Edwards Plateau Woodland, Llano Uplift, Semiarid Edwards Plateau
Arid Llano Estacado, Canadian/Cimarron High Plains, Llano Estacado, Rolling Sand Plains, Shinnery Sands
Northern Nueces Alluvial Plains, Semiarid Edwards Bajada
Canadian/Cimarron Breaks, Caprock Canyons Badlands Breaks, Flat Tablelands and Valleys, Semiarid Canadian Breaks

Plant Characteristics

Growth Form

Herbaceous

Height

0.5
to
1.5
ft.

Spread

1
to
1
ft.

Leaf Retention

Evergreen

Lifespan

Perennial

Habitat and Care Requirements

Soil Type(s)

Sand, Limestone, Caliche, Well Drained, Dry

Light Requirement

Sun

Water Requirement

Low

Native Habitat

Grassland

Bloom and Attraction

Bloom Color

White, Yellow

Bloom Season

Spring, Summer, Fall

Seasonal Interest

Seeds, Nectar, Pollen

Wildlife Benefit

Butterflies, Birds, Hummingbirds, Bees

Maintenance

Prune lightly if leggy or to remove dead material Does not like rich soil or wet feet; do not fertilize or water regularly. Our natural rainfall is enough for this plant. Overwatering, too much mulch or poor drainage can be fatal. Will flourish in rock gardens. It is heat and drought tolerant. Good drainage is essential to its success. Can be tricky to get established. Flowers have a pleasant honey scent. Prefers dry, calcalreous substrates.

Comments

Blooms March-November. A low, mounding, plant with white, daisy shaped flowers, surrounding a small yellow central disc. It is covered with narrow leaves. Can be mistaken for White Zinnia (Zinnia acerosa). Attracts: bees, butterflies, birds.

References

1) Griffith, Bryce, Omernick & Rodgers (2007). Ecoregions of Texas. 2) Wasowski and Wasowski, Native Texas Plants Landscaping Region by Region, 1991, pg. 197. 3) https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=MELE2. 4) https://portal.torcherbaria.org/portal/taxa/index.php?taxon=Melampodium+leucanthum&formsubmit=Search+Terms. 5) http://bonap.net/TDC/Image/Map?taxonType=Species&taxonId=3798&locationType=County&mapType=Normal., 6) https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=38085#null, 7) Native and Adapted Landscape Plants, City of Austin and Texas A&M, 2014.