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Wafer Ash

Ptelea trifoliata

Other common name(s):

Common Hoptree, Hop Tree

Family:

Rutaceae (Rue Family)

Plant Ecoregion Distribution Map

Chihuahuan Deserts, Cross Timbers, East Central Texas Plains, Edwards Plateau, Gulf Coast Prairies and Marshes, Southern Texas Plains, Southwestern Tablelands, Texas Blackland Prairies, Western Gulf Coastal Plain
Chihuahuan Basins and Playas, Chihuahuan Desert Grasslands, Chihuahuan Montane Woodlands, Low Mountains and Bajadas
Grand Prairie, Limestone Cut Plain, Western Cross Timbers
Bastrop Lost Pines, Floodplains and Low Terraces2, San Antonio Prairie, Southern Post Oak Savanna
Balcones Canyonlands, Edwards Plateau Woodland, Llano Uplift
Floodplains and Low Terraces4, Lower Rio Grande Alluvial Floodplain, Northern Humid Gulf Coastal Prairies, Southern Subhumid Gulf Coastal Prairies, Texas-Louisiana Coastal Marshes
Northern Nueces Alluvial Plains, Semiarid Edwards Bajada
Canadian/Cimarron Breaks, Caprock Canyons Badlands Breaks, Flat Tablelands and Valleys, Semiarid Canadian Breaks
Floodplains and Low Terraces1, Northern Blackland Prairie, Southern Blackland Prairie
Flatwoods, Floodplains and Low Terraces3, Southern Tertiary Uplands

Plant Characteristics

Growth Form

Tree

Height

10
to
15
ft.

Spread

10
to
10
ft.

Leaf Retention

Deciduous

Lifespan

Perennial

Habitat and Care Requirements

Soil Type(s)

Sand, Loam, Clay, Limestone, Acid, Alkaline, Calcareous, Well Drained

Light Requirement

Sun, Shade

Water Requirement

Low, Medium, High

Native Habitat

Woodland

Bloom and Attraction

Bloom Color

White, Green

Bloom Season

Spring

Seasonal Interest

Seeds, Nectar, Larval Host

Wildlife Benefit

Butterflies, Birds, Bees

Maintenance

Prune for shape or to raise canopy. Propagation: Seed, Softwood cuttings, Semi-hardwood cuttings.

Comments

Blooms March-July. Attractive, tall shrub or small understory tree, for both moist conditions and dry rocky sites. However, prefers moist soil such as watered garden or seep area. If grown in full sun and cut back, will be quite bushy. All parts aromatic. Larval Host: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and Giant Swallowtail.

References

1) Griffith, Bryce, Omernick & Rodgers (2007). Ecoregions of Texas. 2) Miller, George O., Landscaping with Native Plants of Texas 2nd Ed., 2013, pg 53. 3) https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=PTTR. 4) https://portal.torcherbaria.org/portal/taxa/index.php?taxon=Ptelea+trifoliata&formsubmit=Search+Terms. 5) http://bonap.net/TDC/Image/Map?taxonType=Species&taxonId=22430&locationType=County&mapType=Normal. 6) https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=28992#null