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Leopold Week 2024 – “First and Wildest” Author Panel

Since Aldo Leopold proposed its designation 100 years ago, the Gila Wilderness has meant many things to many people. Essayists from "First & Wildest" will share their own connections to the Gila and examine the diverse relationships people have with the first Wilderness Area. Register below for the entire series of Leopold Week events.

Free

Leopold Week 2024 – Ed Yong and “An Immense World”

Human senses offer just one experience out of millions on earth. Ed Yong, award-winning journalist and author of An Immense World, will take us beyond the limitations of our human perception to better understand the wonders and wildness of our diverse planet. Register below for the entire series of Leopold Week events.

Free

Leopold Week 2024 – 2023-24 Future Leaders Fellows

For nine months, the Future Leaders Fellows have been immersed in the work of the Aldo Leopold Foundation and the landscape that inspired Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac. Join the fellows as they reflect on growing their land ethics and look forward to the rest of their conservation careers. Register below for the entire series […]

Free

NPSOT Dallas March 18, 2024 meeting with Dusty Rhoads:  “Prairie in Your Pocket – How Folks Can Restore the Texas Horned Lizard with Native Plants”

Many folks remember seeing Horned Lizards (aka “Horny Toads”) in bygone decades, including here in Dallas. This talk explores how everyday Texans can use native plants to link, increase, improve, and create populations, habitat, & food webs for the prosperity and “comeback” of the Texas Horned Lizard. Read more.... ZOOM our monthly meetings at:  https://npsot.us9.list-manage.com/track/click?u=f20269a37974d8413fc79c831&id=12aa33f97f&e=d2e8f28b23 If […]

Austin Chapter Meeting – Hello Invasives! Goodbye Texas! – March 19

“What harm can there be in planting one plant in my backyard? Just because it has Japanese, Chinese, Asian, Italian or Mediterranean in its name it will be OK, won’t it?” they ask. It’s easy to think that the plants we cultivate in our landscapes don’t have much impact on our environment, but they do! […]

This Wild Life: Heroines in the History of Botany – Mar. 29, Apr. 5, Apr. 12

Arizona State University Instructor: Lucretia Weems Cost $42Sessions are on 3 days: Fridays, Mar. 29 & Apr. 5, Apr. 129:30 a.m. – 11 a.m. | Zoom The women in these pages led amazing lives. Some encountered pirates, some witnessed historic earthquakes, some received visits from the Queen. Each was a true heroine who contributed dramatically […]

$42

Collin County – April Chapter Meeting – Cultivating a Butterfly Haven

Our April 2nd chapter meeting will include a presentation by Melanie Schuchart on "Cultivating a Butterfly Haven with Native Plants of North Texas." Our North Texas native plants can provide for butterflies year-round. But which native plants should you choose to attract a variety of butterflies and provide for the various butterfly life stages? Melanie […]

Executive Committee Meeting – Apr 10

Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSOT) Executive Committee meetings occur monthly and any member may attend. Contact the Executive Director prior to the meeting at state@npsot.org for Zoom and applicable document links. Please be prepared to follow the Visitor’s Executive Meeting Protocol.

NPAT Zoom Series – Climate, Water, Science and Society in 21st Century Texas – A Historical Perspective – April 11

From our partners at the Native Prairies Association of Texas (NPAT). How will climate change impact Texas and the native prairie and savanna ecosystems? How do we plan restorations to be sustainable in 2050? Do we need to change our land management practices? The NPAT Fayette Prairie Chapter will host a year-long series of presentations […]

Free

Drought-Tolerant Native Plants: Nothing Works Like Natives – Williamson County Chapter Meeting, April 11

Join NPSOT-Williamson County on Thursday, April 11, 2024, when our featured topic will be “Drought-Tolerant Native Plants: Nothing Works Like Natives” with Randy Pensabene.  Free and open to the public. The meeting begins at 7:00 PM.  Our guest speaker’s presentation begins after a short business meeting. NEW Randy has provided a handout ==> (link updated Apr 14) click […]

NPSOT Dallas April 15th, 2024 meeting with Janet D. Smith: The Right Plant in the Right Place

It’s not just the placement of plants in your yard, but in the world that will sustain life as we know it.  Plants that feed the local insects are the base of the food web and give us a planet we can live on.  Read more.... ZOOM our monthly meetings at:  https://npsot.us9.list-manage.com/track/click?u=f20269a37974d8413fc79c831&id=12aa33f97f&e=d2e8f28b23 If needed, use: Meeting […]

Chapter Leader Forum – Apr 18

Topic: How to Navigate the Member Portal, Find State Forms and Materials, and More! Description:  We know that navigating the Member Portal and Dropbox can be challenging, so we are here to help. Meg will tell you how to log on to your Member Portal and look through all the resources that are available to […]

Predatory Garden Insects from the Nature Discovery Center – April 18

Join us to have a look at the various predatory insects that can be found in the native plant gardens at the Nature Discovery Center, such as assassin bugs, ladybird Beetles, and Wasps. We will also talk about what you can do to encourage them to stay and prey in your garden.

“Get Real” Garden Design with Native Plants

Fredericksburg Chapter of Native Plant Society of Texas Speaker Paula Stone on April 23 Find out how to make your landscape maintenance easier by choosing the right layout, the right […]

2024 City Nature Challenge – Bioblitz

Started in 2016 as a competition between Los Angeles and San Francisco, the City Nature Challenge (CNC) has grown into an international event, motivating people around the world to find […]

Texas Wildflower Day!

The fourth Saturday in April is Texas Wildflower Day! The state NPSOT Social Media campaign will begin on April 21st with wildflower images all week and culminate on the actual […]

Q2 State Board Meeting – May 4

Chapter members are welcome, but not everyone may vote. Voting members include chapter presidents, executive officers, and state standing committee chairs. Native Plant Society of Texas members receive an email […]

Executive Committee Meeting – May 8

Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSOT) Executive Committee meetings occur monthly and any member may attend. Contact the Executive Director prior to the meeting at state@npsot.org for Zoom and applicable document links. […]

Green Jobs: Exploring STEM Natural Resource Careers

Webinar with Ted Stevens, Education Director, Texas Forestry Association Learn how to use Project Learning Tree's new Green Jobs guide that is TEKS-aligned and STEM correlated to inspire your students […]

Executive Committee Meeting

Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSOT) Executive Committee meetings occur monthly and any member may attend. Contact the Executive Director prior to the meeting at state@npsot.org for Zoom and applicable document links. […]

Night Wings Over the Prairie – Insect Life After Dark – June 20

As native plant enthusiasts, you probably know a lot about prairie plants and their associated insect life during the daytime.  But how much do you know about insect nightlife? Join us as we explore nocturnal insect species at three Houston-area prairies.

Executive Committee Meeting

Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSOT) Executive Committee meetings occur monthly and any member may attend. Contact the Executive Director prior to the meeting at state@npsot.org for Zoom and applicable document links. […]

Williamson County Annual Chapter Meeting, July 11

Join NPSOT-Williamson County Thursday, July 11, 2024, for our annual chapter meeting. Free and open to the public. The meeting begins at 7:00 PM.   Results of the chapter board election […]

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About the Region

New Braunfels, the location of our Fall 2024 Symposium, straddles both the Edwards Plateau Ecoregion and the Blackland Prairie ecoregion. Interstate 35 divides the city of New Braunfels; its path through the city closely parallels the boundary of these two ecoregions, with the Edwards Plateau on the west side and the Blackland Prairies region to the east. The Edwards Plateau area is also called the Hill Country; however, this general term covers a much larger area extending farther north. Spring-fed creeks are found throughout the region; deep limestone canyons, rivers, and lakes (reservoirs) are common. Ashe juniper is perhaps the most common woody species found throughout the region. Additional woody species include various species of oak, with live oak (Quercus fusiformis) being the most common. Sycamores (Platanus occidentalis) and bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) border waterways. This area is well known for its spring wildflower displays, though they may be viewed in spring, late summer, and fall, as well. According to Texas Parks and Wildlife, average annual rainfall in the Edwards Plateau ranges from 15 to 34 inches.

The Blackland Prairie extends from the Red River south to San Antonio, bordered on the west by the Edwards Plateau and the Cross Timbers, and on the east by the Post Oak Savannah. Annual rainfall averages 30 to 40 inches, with higher averages to the east. This region is dominated by prairie species. The most common grass species include little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) and Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) in the uplands and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) in the riparian areas and drainages. Common herbaceous flowering plants include salvias, penstemons, and silphiums. This area has suffered greatly from overgrazing and agricultural use. Few intact areas remain, though many of the plants can be found along county roadsides throughout the region.

Our four host chapters (New Braunfels, Lindheimer, Guadalupe, and the Hill Country chapters) are located in one or both of the ecoregions above. However, the eastern portion of Guadalupe County also falls within the Post Oak Savanna ecoregion. Annual rainfall averages 35 to 45 inches, with higher averages to the east. A wide variety of hardwood trees are found, including several species of oaks, elms, and in the Bastrop area, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). Grasses and forbs dominate in the open savannas, with most common grass being little bluestem. Ranching, agriculture, and fire suppression have allowed woody species to encroach on the once-open savannas.

Source: Wildflowers of Texas by Michael Eason