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Invasive Plants

Arundo donax; Photo credit: Deedy Wright

On a global basis … the two great destroyers of biodiversity are, first, habitat destruction and second, invasion by exotic species. 

E. O. Wilson, Father of Biodiversity

Our Mission

The mission of the NPSOT Invasive Plant Committee is to convey the harm caused by invasive plants, to provide informational resources to identify and manage invasive plants, to support invasive plant removal and to restore habitats with native plant alternatives.

To contact the Invasive Plant Committee, send us an email

Negative Impact of Invasive Plants

  1. Contribute to the decline of our natural biodiversity.
  2. Impact the health of ecosystems by displacing native plants. 
  3. Impact nature’s balance on which all species, including humans, depend.
 

In order to preserve the biodiversity and conserve natural habitat quality throughout our state, the Native Plant Society of Texas encourages the use of native plants on public and private lands and discourages the use of invasive plants.

Invasive Plant Database

To search for plants in the invasive plant database, use the search box below and filter by type of plant if desired and press Submit. 

You can enter the plant’s common or scientific name, or other relevant criteria to refine your search. 

The database will return matching invasive plants, along with detailed information about each species’ characteristics, impacts, and more. We also show information about removal and appropriate native species replacements for your ecoregion.

Quihoui Privet

Ligustrum quihoui

Shrub

Red Tip Photinia

Photinia X fraseri

Shrub

Rose Glorybower

Clerodendrum bungei

Shrub

Salt Cedar

Tamarix spp.

Shrub, Tree

Salvinia

Salvinia spp.

Aquatic

Scarlet Firethorn

Pyracantha coccinea

Shrub

Siberian Elm

Ulmus pumila

Tree

Spotted Knapweed

Centaurea stoebe ssp. micranthos

Biennial, Perennial

St. Augustine Grass

Stenotaphrum secundatum

Grass and Sedge

Taiwanese Photinia

Photinia serratifolia

Shrub, Tree

Thorny Olive

Elaeagnus pungens

Shrub, Tree

Tree of Heaven

Ailanthus altissima

Tree

Trifoliate Orange

Citrus trifoliata

Shrub, Tree

Tropical Soda Apple

Solanum viarum

Shrub

Vitex

Vitex agnus-castus

Shrub, Tree

Water Lettuce

Pistia stratiotes

Aquatic, Perennial

White Mulberry

Morus alba

Tree

White Poplar

Populus alba

Tree

Yellow Flag Iris

Iris pseudacorus

Aquatic, Perennial

Yellow Floating Heart

Nymphoides peltata

Aquatic, Perennial

  • Sort Order:

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About the Region

New Braunfels, the location of our Fall 2024 Symposium, straddles both the Edwards Plateau Ecoregion and the Blackland Prairie ecoregion. Interstate 35 divides the city of New Braunfels; its path through the city closely parallels the boundary of these two ecoregions, with the Edwards Plateau on the west side and the Blackland Prairies region to the east. The Edwards Plateau area is also called the Hill Country; however, this general term covers a much larger area extending farther north. Spring-fed creeks are found throughout the region; deep limestone canyons, rivers, and lakes (reservoirs) are common. Ashe juniper is perhaps the most common woody species found throughout the region. Additional woody species include various species of oak, with live oak (Quercus fusiformis) being the most common. Sycamores (Platanus occidentalis) and bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) border waterways. This area is well known for its spring wildflower displays, though they may be viewed in spring, late summer, and fall, as well. According to Texas Parks and Wildlife, average annual rainfall in the Edwards Plateau ranges from 15 to 34 inches.

The Blackland Prairie extends from the Red River south to San Antonio, bordered on the west by the Edwards Plateau and the Cross Timbers, and on the east by the Post Oak Savannah. Annual rainfall averages 30 to 40 inches, with higher averages to the east. This region is dominated by prairie species. The most common grass species include little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) and Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) in the uplands and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) in the riparian areas and drainages. Common herbaceous flowering plants include salvias, penstemons, and silphiums. This area has suffered greatly from overgrazing and agricultural use. Few intact areas remain, though many of the plants can be found along county roadsides throughout the region.

Our four host chapters (New Braunfels, Lindheimer, Guadalupe, and the Hill Country chapters) are located in one or both of the ecoregions above. However, the eastern portion of Guadalupe County also falls within the Post Oak Savanna ecoregion. Annual rainfall averages 35 to 45 inches, with higher averages to the east. A wide variety of hardwood trees are found, including several species of oaks, elms, and in the Bastrop area, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). Grasses and forbs dominate in the open savannas, with most common grass being little bluestem. Ranching, agriculture, and fire suppression have allowed woody species to encroach on the once-open savannas.

Source: Wildflowers of Texas by Michael Eason