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Event Series Native Garden Workday

Native Garden Workday

Texas Museum of Handmade Furniture 1370 Churchill Drive, New Braunfels, Texas, United States

Please join us at the Texas Museum of Handmade Furniture to help maintain the Lindheimer Chapter's native demonstration garden. Please bring water, closed toe shoes, gloves, and your favorite gardening […]

NPSOT Executive Board Meeting

Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSOT) Executive Board meetings occur monthly and any member may attend. Contact the Executive Director prior to the meeting at state@npsot.org for Zoom and applicable […]

Texas Native Plant Week

The third week of October was designated as Texas Native Plant Week by the 2009 Texas Legislature. Texas Native Plants play an important conservation role, and the Texas Annual Wildflower Week educates children and homeowners about the importance of native plants, with many educational opportunities such as plant walks, plant sales, and other outdoor events. Click here if you […]

Texas Native Plant Week

Did you know that in 2009, under Governor Rick Perry, designated the third week of October as Texas Native Plant Week? It was created with the goal to publicize conservation and to hell educate the public. For the week of October 15-21 we are asking everyone to participate in showing off their gardens! Each day […]

Ann Miller Gonzalez Graduate Research Grant Applications Due

Ann Miller Gonzalez Graduate Research Grants This research grant is named in honor of an early supporter of Texas native plants. The maximum amount of each grant is $2500 for the duration of the grantee’s research project. Grant applications are accepted September 1, 2023 through  October 15, 2023 and funds will be distributed in January 2024. See […]

How to Tame a Water-Thirsty Yard: Getting Started on Xeriscape

Is the water bill getting out of hand and the landscape still looks terrible? Or evenworse, is water being rationed? Find out how you can deal with this picture using the principles ofxeriscape. You can have a nicer looking landscape, reduce your water use and shrink the water bill Community class taught by Deedy Wright […]

NLCP Class Austin: Level 1, Introduction to Native Landscapes

Registration is open now! Click here for details and to sign up. For more details about the Native Landscape Certification Program (NLCP) please click here for the class descriptions and click here for the upcoming class schedules statewide. October 18: The in class portion will be presented via Zoom. October 19: The plant walk portion […]

Pines and Prairies Chapter Meeting

The October 18, 2023 Pines and Prairies Chapter meeting (virtual only meeting) will commence at 7 pm and will feature a presentation by Teri MacArthur.  Her presentation will be on the Destructive Nature of Invasive Species.  Teri is a member of the Heartwood chapter of Texas Master Naturalists as well as the Pines and Prairies […]

October Chapter Leader Forum –  Plant Rescues – Part 2

Topic: In Plant Rescues Part 1, Ashley Landry gave a very well received overview of how she organizes plant rescues for her local NPSOT and TMN chapters. This is a follow-up forum where chapter leaders are able to […]

Amending & Blending Soils for Native Plantings – October 19

Come explore some custom tricks of the trade for prepping soils specifically for a variety of native plants, including approaches for improving and restoring existing soils as well as recipes and techniques for blending your own mixes from scratch.

Monarch Festival at Fisher Park

New Braunfels. NB NPSOT chapter president Mary Moses will present a "Biodiversity" sign to Fischer Park staff in recognition of the park's commitment to native plants and biodiversity. Volunteers who wish […]

Deep in the Heart documentary viewing

Deep in the Heart documentary presented for viewing, sponsored by CCCA and Tye Preston library, time 5:30 for meet and greet, 6:15 showing; location is Tye Preston Memorial Library, 16311 S. […]

Cross Timbers Chapter Meeting and Plant Swap

6:00 p.m. Chapter Business Meeting 6:30 p.m. No Program.  Plant Exchange The annual Cross Timbers Plant swap will occur at our October meeting.  This is such a fun and exciting […]

Event Series Native Garden Workday

Native Garden Workday

Texas Museum of Handmade Furniture 1370 Churchill Drive, New Braunfels, Texas, United States

Please join us at the Texas Museum of Handmade Furniture to help maintain the Lindheimer Chapter's native demonstration garden. Please bring water, closed toe shoes, gloves, and your favorite gardening […]

I’m Being Invaded! What Can I Do? – by Deedy Wright

You may have heard the term “invasive plants” used but aren’t quite sure what itmeans—or why you should be concerned. Invasives are becoming a problem inour environment in many ways. […]

Chandor Trail and Pollinator Garden Spruce Up

Chandor Gardens 711 W Lee Ave, Weatherford, Texas Meet at the entrance to the nature trail to help care for our native plants and learn more about their care and […]

TxDOT Roadside Chat – Protecting Migrating Monarchs

Between September and November, ninety percent of all monarch butterflies migrate through Texas. Their journey is arduous—and only getting harder. Over the last 20 years, Monarch numbers have declined due […]

Event Series Native Garden Workday

Native Garden Workday

Heritage Museum of the Texas Hill Country 4831 FM2673, Canyon Lake, Texas, United States

Please join us at the Heritage Museum to help maintain the Lindheimer Chapter's Demonstration Garden. Please bring water, closed toe shoes, gloves, and your favorite gardening tools. Contact Mickey Riviere […]

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About the Region

New Braunfels, the location of our Fall 2024 Symposium, straddles both the Edwards Plateau Ecoregion and the Blackland Prairie ecoregion. Interstate 35 divides the city of New Braunfels; its path through the city closely parallels the boundary of these two ecoregions, with the Edwards Plateau on the west side and the Blackland Prairies region to the east. The Edwards Plateau area is also called the Hill Country; however, this general term covers a much larger area extending farther north. Spring-fed creeks are found throughout the region; deep limestone canyons, rivers, and lakes (reservoirs) are common. Ashe juniper is perhaps the most common woody species found throughout the region. Additional woody species include various species of oak, with live oak (Quercus fusiformis) being the most common. Sycamores (Platanus occidentalis) and bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) border waterways. This area is well known for its spring wildflower displays, though they may be viewed in spring, late summer, and fall, as well. According to Texas Parks and Wildlife, average annual rainfall in the Edwards Plateau ranges from 15 to 34 inches.

The Blackland Prairie extends from the Red River south to San Antonio, bordered on the west by the Edwards Plateau and the Cross Timbers, and on the east by the Post Oak Savannah. Annual rainfall averages 30 to 40 inches, with higher averages to the east. This region is dominated by prairie species. The most common grass species include little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) and Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) in the uplands and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) in the riparian areas and drainages. Common herbaceous flowering plants include salvias, penstemons, and silphiums. This area has suffered greatly from overgrazing and agricultural use. Few intact areas remain, though many of the plants can be found along county roadsides throughout the region.

Our four host chapters (New Braunfels, Lindheimer, Guadalupe, and the Hill Country chapters) are located in one or both of the ecoregions above. However, the eastern portion of Guadalupe County also falls within the Post Oak Savanna ecoregion. Annual rainfall averages 35 to 45 inches, with higher averages to the east. A wide variety of hardwood trees are found, including several species of oaks, elms, and in the Bastrop area, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). Grasses and forbs dominate in the open savannas, with most common grass being little bluestem. Ranching, agriculture, and fire suppression have allowed woody species to encroach on the once-open savannas.

Source: Wildflowers of Texas by Michael Eason